Faith versus Science

Should I say, “faith AND science,” or “faith OR science?”

A lot of people think it’s the latter, claiming that faith and science are not compatible. “They” say that science is about what’s real, tangible, concrete. Faith is about what one can’t see, something spiritual or beyond our physical dimensions and reality. According to the Holy Bible,

. . . faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.

Book of Hebrews, chapter 11, verse 1

I think sceptic scientists who don’t believe in God, perhaps need to realize that they are exercising a bit more faith than they know.

I work with DNA a lot, and today I realized that I’ve never actually seen DNA with my own eyes, and neither did Maurice Wilkins, nor Rosalind Franklin, nor James Watson, nor Francis Crick. Wait a minute, they all helped to discover DNA’s double helix configuration and shape! We’ve all seen the well known drawings and cartoons of DNA’s structure, which are all based on the famous discovery.

photo credit: A double stranded DNA fragment 22 residues long is displayed with alternating adenine residues in green, thymidine in red, cytosine in dark blue, and guanine residues in cyan. The phosphate backbone is displayed as an orange ribbon by Vcpmartin.

But did they believe with conviction and assurance in something that was unseen? I would say that they were exercising faith, as many scientists must.

The very first time that DNA was imaged directly was only in 2012, which was 143 years after Freidrich Miescher first discovered the existence of a DNA-like substance and 60 years after Rosalind Franklin first photographed “shadows” cast by an x-ray beam going through DNA crystals.

Then in 2015, the double helix configuration was more clearly photographed.

Well, we may not see God presently with our own physical eyes, but evidence of His intelligent design abounds, and one day, we will see Him face to face, even more clearly than what these photographs of DNA show.

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